W. Wade and Trena Stooksberry (The DOVES) hail from beautiful Macon, GA – a town located an hour south of Atlanta, renowned for its amazingly rich musical heritage (Lena Horne, Little Richard, Otis Redding, James Brown, The Allman Brothers and Capricorn Records, Mark Heard, Mike Mills and Bill Berry of REM, et. al.), as well as its signature antebellum architecture, which was spared by Sherman during his march to the sea.  Wade also claims musical DNA from his childhood in Memphis. 
They have taken all these influences, and many more, to forge a sound both immediately familiar, and uniquely their own; spanning a gamut from Classic AOR to Adult Contemporary to New Wave, Blues, British Invasion, Southern Revival – and of course, being Southerners, Spiritual. 
The DOVES have been capturing attention and acclaim from radio stations and bloggers both at home and abroad:  New York City, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Baltimore, DC, LA, Seattle, San Francisco; London, Wales, Germany, the Netherlands, Paris, and elsewhere.
The DOVES 14th release is their second album compilation, and first since 2014’s “Day (One)”.  “By and By” finds the duo looking backward and forward:  the titular track, for example, is offered as both an updated version of a track from the couple’s “salad days”; as well as the original track, featuring Trena on bass, David Goldberg on drums, and William Barton on lead guitar [“By and By (1989)” — mastered, as all tracks are, by the incomparable Joey Stuckey].  “Facebook Famous” turns a gently sardonic eye toward the vagaries of social media.  “Let Me Go” features 70s-style dance-funk rhythms, with a special guest appearance by “Charleston Heston” delivering spoken, un-ironic modus profundo.  “Confession” reprises the award-winning rumination on loss and betrayal, soon to be featured on the “Macon Music v. III” compilation.  “Kiernan” is Trena’s sweet ode to her 2-year-old grandson.  “Being Or Not (Being)”, like “By and By”, harkens back to the couple’s early days; another Moody Blues-ish romp that asks the age-old question posed by Shakespeare’s Danish prince in “Hamlet”:  

The Doves - By and By #Flyah Review


W. Wade and Trena Stooksberry (The DOVES) hail from beautiful Macon, GA – a town located an hour south of Atlanta, renowned for its amazingly rich musical heritage (Lena Horne, Little Richard, Otis Redding, James Brown, The Allman Brothers and Capricorn Records, Mark Heard, Mike Mills and Bill Berry of REM, et. al.), as well as its signature antebellum architecture, which was spared by Sherman during his march to the sea.  Wade also claims musical DNA from his childhood in Memphis. 
They have taken all these influences, and many more, to forge a sound both immediately familiar, and uniquely their own; spanning a gamut from Classic AOR to Adult Contemporary to New Wave, Blues, British Invasion, Southern Revival – and of course, being Southerners, Spiritual. 
The DOVES have been capturing attention and acclaim from radio stations and bloggers both at home and abroad:  New York City, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Baltimore, DC, LA, Seattle, San Francisco; London, Wales, Germany, the Netherlands, Paris, and elsewhere.
The DOVES 14th release is their second album compilation, and first since 2014’s “Day (One)”.  “By and By” finds the duo looking backward and forward:  the titular track, for example, is offered as both an updated version of a track from the couple’s “salad days”; as well as the original track, featuring Trena on bass, David Goldberg on drums, and William Barton on lead guitar [“By and By (1989)” — mastered, as all tracks are, by the incomparable Joey Stuckey].  “Facebook Famous” turns a gently sardonic eye toward the vagaries of social media.  “Let Me Go” features 70s-style dance-funk rhythms, with a special guest appearance by “Charleston Heston” delivering spoken, un-ironic modus profundo.  “Confession” reprises the award-winning rumination on loss and betrayal, soon to be featured on the “Macon Music v. III” compilation.  “Kiernan” is Trena’s sweet ode to her 2-year-old grandson.  “Being Or Not (Being)”, like “By and By”, harkens back to the couple’s early days; another Moody Blues-ish romp that asks the age-old question posed by Shakespeare’s Danish prince in “Hamlet”:  

No comments:

Post a Comment